THREE LINE MATRIX

In three steps, this grid supports the clarification of research questions that have already been considered in some depth. Particularly, it supports an exploration of how questions relate to each other, by working backwards into premises of thought. If working as a team, discuss as you fill in the grid. When presenting to a group for feedback, write questions on a Whiteboard after working them out individually, to be able to incorporate suggestions in discussion. This grid can serve to structure a written project description.

About Adelheid Mers:

Adelheid Mers engages in conversations with lay and professional cultural producers about their aesthetic practices. She uses diagrams as tools for figuring, to make cultural ecologies accessible to reflection, with an emphasis on practitioner perspectives. As a tenured professor of arts administration and policy at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Mers appraises cultural processes across scales and manifold participant's interests. As a visual artist, she draws on the performative tools of studio critique to facilitate conversations. Formally, diagrams are defined by their operativity, engendering action and reflection. Mers' diagrams are deployed across media, ranging from quick sketches to freely distributed flyers to manipulable whiteboards; occasions are created for use and response.

Mers works independently, with artists, and with non-profits and their constituencies. She has explored artist's thinking about grant application processes for the 3Arts Foundation, and conducted research on cultural ecologies on Chicago's south and west sides, with the Foundation for Homan Square and the University of Chicago. As part of an ongoing project, Art Work (Visual Art/Music/Management) Mers is currently exploring the practices of sound artists, composers and experimental musicians, in collaboration with colleagues at the Institute of Cultural Management at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna. Her work is presented nationally and internationally, through conference contributions and exhibitions. She has curated thematic exhibitions, published essays on pedagogy, arts administration and art-based research and has edited and published a book, Useful Pictures.

Honors include grants from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the British Council, the NEA, Illinois Arts Council and DCASE. Mers serves on editorial boards, and has recently served as juror for the NEA and the Rauschenberg Foundation.

Mers works with artists and with non-profit clients: with the City of Chicago Mayor's office and department of Innovation and Technology she observed stimulus funding application and uses. She has worked with the Evanston Art Center seeking out local arts ecologies, explored grant making impacts on artists for the 3Arts Foundation and conducted projects on Chicago's south and west sides, with the Foundation for Homan Square and the University of Chicago. Her work is presented nationally and internationally, at conferences and exhibitions. She has curated several exhibitions, published essays on pedagogy, arts administration and art-based research and has edited and published a book, Useful Pictures. Honors include grants from the German Academic Exchange Service, the British Council, NEA, the Illinois Arts Council and DCASE.

About Asha Veal Briseboisis:

Asha Veal Briseboisis currently developing The Tokyo Show: Black is Beautiful, an experimental curatorial project to explore the following contexts: art as an instigator for cross-cultural dialogues across global space; and art as an instigator for potentially disruptive private and public conversations on the constructions of “race.” The project will take place in 2018 in Tokyo, Japan. Asha’s published work as a writer and editor has been acquired in libraries and collections including the George Gustav Heye Center at the National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Libraries, National Museum of African American History & Culture Smithsonian Libraries, Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives, and others. Her work in creative nonfiction has been published by Brooklyn-based Slice Literary, among others. She is the founder of The Places We’ve Been books, an independent publisher, working since 2011 with more than 48 writers from cities and countries globally. Asha holds a BA from The Gallatin School at New York University, and an MFA from the writing program at The New School. She is a recent alumna of the MA Arts Administration & Policy program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and has taught at SAIC as adjunct faculty for the “Flexible Artworlds” course. Asha maintains a curatorial, writing, and editing practice, and has collaborated as an administrator on projects with visual, film, theatre, and literary artists. http://sites.saic.edu/emerge/     http://www.ashavealb.com/